Super Bowl: Baked Fontina (Serves 4 to 6)

Source: http://barefootcontessa.com –  Barefoot Contessa How Easy is That? by Ina Garten

Photo: Quentin Bacon

1½ pounds Italian Fontina Val d’Aosta cheese, rind removed and 1-inch-diced
¼ cup good olive oil
6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary leaves
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 crusty French baguette

Preheat the broiler and position the oven rack 5 inches from the heat.

Distribute the cubes of Fontina evenly in a 12-inch cast-iron pan. Drizzle on the olive oil. Combine the garlic, thyme, and rosemary and sprinkle it over the cheese and olive oil. Sprinkle with the salt and pepper and place the pan under the broiler for 6 minutes, until the cheese is melted and bubbling and starts to brown.
Serve the baked Fontina family-style—right out of the oven in the cast-iron pan with crusty chunks of bread for everyone to dip.

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18 Easy Stews from Martha Stewart

Source:  http://www.delish.com/

Colder temperatures signal the return of stew weather, and we couldn’t be happier. Slow-and-low cooking turns hearty vegetables and economical cuts of meat into tender, saucy stews worthy of company or a weeknight dinner. With these easy, satisfying vegetarian, chicken, and beef stew recipes from Martha Stewart, you’ll be telling Jack Frost, better luck next time.

Warm up with more cool-weather meals: find main-dish casseroles, lasagna, and potato soup recipes here.

Easiest Indian Stew

A thick vegetarian stew made from pantry staples, such as rice, spices, and canned chickpeas, is enlivened with a bit of yogurt and lime. Curry powder, an Indian blend of spices, is a timesaving source of layered flavor; ground ginger brings a quick dash of citrusy warmth.

Recipe: Easiest Indian Stew

Sausage and Pepper Stew

The classic pairing of hot Italian sausage and peppers meets again, this time in a hearty stew.

Recipe: Sausage and Pepper Stew

Slow-Cooked Tex-Mex Chicken and Beans

When preparing this memorable fix-and-forget chicken stew, use high-quality salsa to save time without skimping on flavor.

Recipe: Slow-Cooked Tex-Mex Chicken and Beans

Cuban Black-Bean Stew with Rice

Satisfying bean soups often have to simmer for hours; this vegetarian stew tastes as if it did but uses canned beans and broth as shortcuts.

Recipe: Cuban Black-Bean Stew with Rice

Asian Shrimp Stew with Steamed Rice

Sharp, fragrant ginger invigorates this dish. Because it’s potent and fibrous, use a sharp knife to mince it. To keep this stew tasting bright, avoid overcooking the vegetables.

Recipe: Asian Shrimp Stew with Steamed Rice

Chicken with Tomatoes and Mushrooms

Also known as chicken cacciatore, this rustic stew cooks in a rich tomato mushroom sauce. Serve over rice or with a thick slice of crusty bread.

Recipe: Chicken with Tomatoes and Mushrooms

Moroccan Lamb

Using dried fruit (such as prunes and apricots) in savory dishes is traditional in Moroccan and Middle Eastern cooking. Here, these dried fruits mingle with the rich, distinctive flavor of lamb in a tomato-based stew.

Recipe: Moroccan Lamb

Quick Vegetable and Navy-Bean Stew

You don’t have to spend a long time in the kitchen to make a full-flavored stew; our potato, bean, and mushroom stew is ready in less than an hour.

Recipe: Quick Vegetable and Navy-Bean Stew

Half-Hour Chicken Gumbo

Rely on rotisserie chicken, smoked spicy sausage, and frozen okra from the store to stack up flavors in our quick rendition of a classic Cajun stew.

Recipe: Half-Hour Chicken Gumbo

Moroccan Chicken Stew with Sweet Potatoes

Cinnamon and ginger complement the sweet potatoes in this easy but exotic-tasting chicken stew. Fluffy couscous absorbs the aromatic sauce.

Recipe: Moroccan Chicken Stew with Sweet Potatoes

Black-Bean-and-Corn Stew

Garnish this hearty vegetarian stew with sour cream, cheddar cheese, diced red onion, toasted pumpkin seeds, or chopped chives; serve with heated flour tortillas.

Recipe: Black-Bean-and-Corn Stew

Beef Stew

You can make this beef stew in the oven or a slow cooker. Either way, you will have a warming, wholesome, and wonderfully flavorful meal.

Recipe: Beef Stew

Mediterranean Chicken Stew

Browning the chicken adds another layer of flavor to this hearty stew. Cook it in two batches to ensure that the chicken browns properly and doesn’t steam. The caramelization on the chicken and on the bottom of the pan is what flavors the stew.

Recipe: Mediterranean Chicken Stew

Spicy Pork Stew

With bold, Indian-influenced spicing and slow-and-low cooking, an inexpensive cut of pork becomes meltingly tender and fragrant.

Recipe: Spicy Pork Stew

Firehouse Chicken Stew

When members of the FDNY aren’t busy fighting fires, they’re fighting their own rumbling stomachs with this vegetable-rich chicken stew.

Recipe: Firehouse Chicken Stew

Irish Lamb Stew

This satisfying stew, filled with tender lamb and vegetables simmered in a beer-based broth, is just the cure for a chilly evening.

Recipe: Irish Lamb Stew

Slow-Cooker Spiced Chicken Stew with Carrots

Juicy chicken thighs get the Moroccan treatment when they’re seasoned with cinnamon and cumin and garnished with toasted almonds.

Recipe: Slow-Cooker Spiced Chicken Stew with Carrots

Slow-Cooker Turkey Stew with Lima Beans

Layering the ingredients with the beans on the bottom ensures proper cooking of this stew. Avoid opening the lid as this will increase the cooking time.

Recipe: Slow-Cooker Turkey Stew with Lima Beans

Hearty Recipes from Martha Stewart

Find more hearty recipes that are great for fall or anytime at MarthaStewart.com:

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Chicken Pot Pie

Source:  (http://www.thedailymeal.com) – by Denise Woodward and Laudalino Ferreira

Food - French chicken_pot_pie_denise_woodward_and_laudalino_ferreiraI decided to forgo the traditional chicken pot pie — you know the one full of chicken, peas, carrots, and celery. I wanted this one to be a little French.

The saucy sauce that brought the dish together was made with a little olive oil, butter, flour, chicken stock, and an abundance of fresh tarragon — the French part of the dish. Don’t all French recipes seem to use so much tarragon? The tarragon seemed to make what can otherwise be a heavy meal light. The pot pie was fresh-tasting, and the vegetables were still slightly crisp, not overcooked.

See all pie recipes.

Click here to see 1 Chicken Recipe, 5 Meals.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for the ramekins
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small shallot, diced very finely
  • 1 carrot, diced finely
  • 1 stalk celery, diced finely
  • 1/4 pound green beans, chopped finely
  • 1 small yellow squash, chopped finely
  • 1 russet potato, diced finely
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons tarragon, torn into pieces
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 large cooked chicken breast, chopped finely
  • One 14-ounce package frozen puff pastry, such as Dufour, thawed
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon water

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Butter 2 large ramekins or 4 smaller ones. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the shallot, stir, and cook until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the carrot and celery, stir, and cook for 5 more minutes.

Add the green beans, yellow squash, and russet potato. Stir and cook for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and tarragon, stir, and cook for 1 minute. Remove from the heat and set aside.

In a small saucepan, heat the butter and remaining olive oil over medium heat until the butter is melted. Whisk in the flour, and continue cooking until slightly bubbly, about 1 minute. Add the chicken broth, whisk until smooth, and cook over low heat until thickened, about 3-5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Pour the sauce over the vegetable mixture, and gently stir in the chicken. Pour the mixture into the ramekins. Cut the puff pastry into pieces slightly larger than the tops of the ramekins. Cover the tops of the ramekins with the puff pastry. Lightly crimp the sides of the puff pastry over the sides.

In a bowl, beat the egg with the water, and gently brush the tops of the puff pastry with the egg wash. Put the ramekins onto a baking sheet and slide into the oven. Bake until the tops are golden and the insides are bubbly (the filling will begin to come out the sides), about 25-35 minutes.

Recipe Details

Click here to see more recipes from Chez Us.

Servings: 4 Cuisine: American Special Designations: Kid-friendly

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January 11 is National Hot Toddy Day

cocktail, cocktail party, five food finds, gail borden, hot toddy, national food holidays, national hot toddy day, today in food history

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

National Hot Toddy Day

Five Food Finds about Cocktails

  • The first cocktail party was held for 50 house guests in St. Louis in 1917. The house still stands today….as the  residence of the Archbishop.
  • While Prohibition resulted in a decline in alcohol it also resulted in a dramatic increase in crime as money flowed to the bad guys. Crime rose as high as 500% in some countries. Consequently, government costs soared while tax revenue declined.
  • Calling an illegal bar a ‘speakeasy’ came from a lady barkeep who would warn her customers to “speak easy, boy, speak easy” whenever they became loud enough to attract police.
  • A greater crime was what it did to the cocktail. Prior to Prohibition, America was enjoying its first golden age of mixology. Once liquor became illegal, ‘rum runners” brought it in by boat but watered down their blends so they could ship less and make more.

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10 Good Luck Foods

Enjoy good luck in 2014 with these simple foods.

My Meals are on Wheels

More success, happiness and good health in 2014? We’ll toast to that! Start the new year out right with these good luck recipes. All from the Food.Com web site.

 

 
10 Good Luck FoodsFOOD COM

 
Success: Hoppin’ John

Simple but delicious, Hoppin’ John (made with black-eyed peas) represents success because each pea represents a coin, and a whole serving equals prosperity….

 

 
Happiness: Glitter Grapes

Try the Spanish and Portuguese tradition of eating 12 grapes at midnight on New Year’s Eve — sweet ones supposedly lead to 12 happy months….

 

 
Progress: Roast Pork Loin

Eating pork on New Year’s Day symbolizes progress in several countries, as the pig is known for pushing forward.

 

 
* Click the link below to get all 10 recipes to start of 2014 the right way! *

 
http://www.food.com/slideshow/new-years-good-luck-food-287

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National Cake Day

charles m. schulz, daily food history, facts, five food finds, food, foodimentary, fun, J.B. Sutherland, john loudon mcadam, life, National Cake, national cake day, today’s food history, W. Atlee Burpee, Willis Haviland Carrier, wordpress

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

National Cake Day

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1836 John Loudon McAdam died. He invented macadam pavement for roads. The Macadamia Nut was named for him.

1867 J.B. Sutherland patented the refrigerated railroad car.
1876 Willis Haviland Carrier was born. He invented the first practical air conditioner.

1915 W. Atlee Burpee died. Founder of the world’s largest mail-order seed company in 1876.
1922 Charles M. Schulz was born. American cartoonist, best known for the ‘Peanuts’ comic strip.
1942‘Casablanca’, the movie, premiers in New York City on Thanksgiving Day.
1968 Rock group Cream’s last concert (Albert Hall).
1991 Japan agrees to stop using drift nets in commercial fishing.
2002 Verne H. Winchell died. Founder of Winchell’s Donuts in 1948; known as ‘The Donut King.’

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Red Enchilada Sauce

annie's cooking lab

Enchilada Sauce ~ Annie's Cooking Lab

I love Mexican food, partially because it’s so vegetarian friendly- lots of beans, rice, and veggies, but also because of the spices and flavors that are used. I just started making my own enchilada sauce this summer and I’m so glad I did. As with most things homemade, it’s significantly tastier than the stuff from the grocery store, and it isn’t filled with lots of weird preservatives.

Make sure you buy good quality chili powder, it provides most of the flavor in the sauce. Depending on the brand you get your sauce might turn out fairly bright red, or a more reddish-brown like mine. Either way it’ll be great for enchiladas, as a dressing over a Tex-Mex style salad, or as a dip with chips and veggies.

Red Enchilada Sauce

Ingredients

  • 4 tbl. chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp. cumin
  • 1/4 tsp. oregano
  • 2 tbl…

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